Cherry Season

While many Kiwis are excited for December to roll around for the festive season and cheer, others eagerly await the New Zealand summer, as it marks the beginning of the New Zealand cherry season. The Produce Company sources only the best New Zealand cherries from the market to supply our customers with this delicious stone fruit.

New Zealand’s cherry season is quite short, and the trees grow best in the areas of the country that experience cold winters and hot, dry summers, such as Hawke’s Bay, parts of Waikato, Wairarapa, Nelson, Blenheim, Canterbury and Central Otago.

Sunny, and warm days with little rain are optimal for a good cherry season. Long periods of rain, or even a short spell just as the fruit reaches maturity, are a killer, causing the flesh to swell and skins to split – turning a good-looking crop into a disaster.

Given the unpredictable nature of a Kiwi summer, which specific breeds of New Zealand cherry will be available, and of high quality, can differ across the season. Growers use two different methods to optimise their harvest.

The first is double-grafting cherry trees with two cross-pollinating varieties on the same tree. These usually ripen at different times and allow the grower to spread their harvest season over at least a few weeks. The other method is to plant two, three or four different varieties in one hole for maximum yield in minimum space.

The Benefits of Eating Cherries

Did you know that as well as being a delicious snack or versatile ingredient, research also suggests increasing your intake of cherries can also help lower the risk of gout attacks?

Cherries have been shown to lower the levels of uric acid in the body preventing crystals from forming and causing painful joint inflammation. While it is unclear exactly which nutrient or combination of nutrients are responsible for this health benefit, scientists believe it is likely the result of the fruit’s anti-inflammatory properties.

Given the unpredictable nature of a Kiwi summer, which specific breeds of New Zealand cherry will be available, and of high quality, can differ across the season. Growers use two different methods to optimise their harvest.

The first is double-grafting cherry trees with two cross-pollinating varieties on the same tree. These usually ripen at different times and allow the grower to spread their harvest season over at least a few weeks. The other method is to plant two, three or four different varieties in one hole for maximum yield in minimum space.

Did you know that as well as being a delicious snack or versatile ingredient, research also suggests increasing your intake of cherries can also help lower the risk of gout attacks?

Cherries have been shown to lower the levels of uric acid in the body preventing crystals from forming and causing painful joint inflammation. While it is unclear exactly which nutrient or combination of nutrients are responsible for this health benefit, scientists believe it is likely the result of the fruit’s anti-inflammatory properties.